Pontiac renovations, part 20.

Windshield defroster heater

I continued dismantling the engine compartment, from the firewall was removed the windshield defroster heater. It was disconnected when I got the car, and had shown signs of leaking.

Heater box in pieces

I spoke to a guy who rebuilds the heater valves. This one is a thermostatic Ranco valve, and it leaks around the spindle seal. The thermostatic portion of the valve was checked and is fully operational.

Heater matrix

I flushed the heater matrix out. Not much dirt came out of it, surprisingly. It is free flowing both ways and doesn’t appear to leak.

Orbital sander

I buzzed the rust and paint off the heater box with my orbital sander.

Outer clamshell

I applied rust treatment and painted the shell semi-gloss black.

Removing rust

All the screws were very rusty. They looked as though they were originally plated with chrome, but that was long gone. I sanded them down smooth in my drill.

Shiny screws

The screws were then pushed into the side of a cardboard box.

Then the screws were painted gloss black enamel.

Reassembled heater box

The heater box was then greased (spring loaded parts) and reassembled. Once the valve is rebuilt, it’ll go back onto the heater frame and be connected via hose to the rest of the system.

Horn, drilled

Someone kindly sent a pair of (mid sixties) Delco horns for the car. While they aren’t visibly the same, the tone they produce is the same. The brackets were too short and at the song angle so I drilled out the spot welds to remove the brackets.

Steel

I bought a length of bar stock of the same size as the original brackets.

Measure and mark

I measured up, marked out, drilled and filed two brackets to shape.

Horn brackets

A few holes drilled for welds and the brackets are offered up to give a visual representation.

Horns with brackets

Having filed surfaces down I decided to clean up and paint the horns. They were rubbed down with a wire brush and painted up in gloss black enamel, as per original spec.

Nice finish

I do like gloss black enamel. It produces such a wonderful result straight out of the can.

Paint scraper

Being as I was working in the firewall area, I decided to start removing old rust and paint, in order to be able to apply new.

Bare metal

I ran out of time after this photograph was taken. There’s a lot of nooks and crannies to sand, with some areas that I cannot fit the sander in. A finger sander/powerfile would be the tool of choice here.

5128

The original written code for Starmist Blue was written on the shell. I had sanded over it but it’s etched into the metal. It’ll not be visible after paint, but it’ll be there.

Glove box badge

The glove box badge was originally all silver. However, over the years the silver has fallen off. Previous keeper had painted red over the back, which looked horrible as a lot of the silver was still present.

Brass brush

I attempted to mechanically remove the paint from the back of the badge. It did remove quite a lot but still, not enough.

Partially clean

The net result was poor. I spoke to a few people and they suggested oven cleaner. Apparently it doesn’t attack the plastic but removes the paint.

Clear

They were not wrong! All the paint came off nicely.

Lettering

I dripped cream colored paint into the lettering with a piece of small gauge wire.

Lettering done

With the lettering looking tidy, I took my pillarbox red paint and converted the back side of the plastic.

Red

Overall, very pleased with the results.

Restored badge

It looks good now. Not perfect but a lot better than it was.

Glovebox

Finally reattached that to the car. It needs to look nice, it can be seen from outside and the passenger has it right in front of them all the time.

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