Pontiac renovations, part 19.

Car, pushed outside.

I pressure washed the car and the engine compartment down, working to remove more dirt from the chassis.

Cleaner engine compartment

With that washed down, the car was parked back into the garage and left to dry.

I ended up having to buy a couple of tools. An inch-and-a-quarter socket to remove the nut from the bottom of the Pitman arm and a puller to remove the arm itself.

Puller

That allowed me to remove the rather sizeable nut holding the Pitman arm on.

Securing nut and washer

Which then allowed me to pull the Pitman arm off the cross shaft.

Pitman arm splines

With the arm removed, the cross-shaft could then be removed and checked for condition.

Cross-shaft

The ball race was a little slack but otherwise good, the plain bearings that carry the shaft are worn, and in need of replacement but for now I’m going to repack the box and come back to the problem.

Steering box lid
Steering box

I took the ball race apart to clean it up in gasoline. There’s a mix of the wrong type of grades of grease in the steering box and a lot of it had congealed badly.

Soaking in gasoline

Reassembled, tightened up a little then peened the nut. Most of the slack in the ball race is now gone.

Clean cross-shaft

Then to stop it from deteriorating, I gave the steering box lid a coat of paint.

Painted black
John Deere “corn head” grease

I bought a tube of corn head grease, a polyurea blend grease that will sag down once it’s been pushed out of the way, ideal for this application. It’s also designed to only become fluid where it’s worked. Around seals it stays very solid and doesn’t leak out so badly.

Chassis leg and brake master cylinder

I then started cleaning up the chassis leg on the driver’s side. The brakes needed looking at because pressing down on the pedal would sometimes cause it to jam, and it would always make a bad noise.

Bent fillet

The fillet plate had been installed incorrectly, was bent and fouling the brake pedal.

Rust treatment

I hammered it flat again, rubbed the rust down and applied rust converter.

Fillet painted and in place

I painted the panel up, and fixed it in place correctly.

Sounds deadening material

The original sound deadening was added back to the fillet.

All set in place

The clutch pedal blanking plate was fitted, after having been found sitting in a crook of the chassis, which looked like it had been there years. Then the top sections were added. Looking better and the pedal moved smoothly past it.

Brake pedal

Then, I took it all apart again to remove the brake pedal. The clevis pin was missing it’s R clip, and wouldn’t come out to be serviced. I ended up having to hammer it out. Repainted everything up after that.

Painted pedal

The grease point was a large glob of dirt, and upon removal, showed that it had not been greased in a long time.

Grease nipple with old grease

That was all cleaned, the operation of the nipple was checked, and everything reassembled.

R clip

I bought a new R clip for the clevis.

Paint

Finally, I finished cleaning the area and started to add some paint to the chassis.

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